The swan effect

 

Whether it’s your house, your hair and makeup, your wardrobe… who doesn’t love a makeover? And if the proliferation of shows like Biggest Loser, Extreme Makeover and the new Selling Houses are anything to go by, the ugly-duckling-to-swan story is a human condition TV producers are very happy to exploit.

Professor David Rowe, of the Institute for Culture and Society, University of Western Sydney, recently told the Sydney Morning Herald that most people have grown up with the story of the ‘ugly duckling being turned into a swan. “We have become obsessed with makeovers – be it our bodies, our homes, even our brains,” he said.

“We love to see people transformed,” adds relationship psychologist John Aitken. “The makeover is coming out, a visual way of seeing someone change. We want to see how they are transformed.”

That transformation is of course most powerful for those experiencing it. In a long-term study, researchers at the Ruhr-University Bochum in Germany investigated the psychological effects of plastic surgery, testing the patients before surgery, as well as three, six and 12 months afterwards. On average, the participants claimed to have achieved their desired goal, and to be satisfied with the results in the long-term. Compared to those who had chosen not to have plastic surgery, the patients felt healthier, were less anxious, had developed more self-esteem and found the operated body feature in particular, but also their body as a whole, more attractive.

It’s important to note, however that any decision to undergo plastic surgery should not be made lightly, and only following thorough research and consultations – something Dr Rohit Kumar at Sydney Cosmetic Sanctuary puts foremost.

Ready to stage your own makeover? Contact the team at Sydney Cosmetic Sanctuary today.

Photo credit MrWildLife at Freedigitalphotos.net

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